nineveh_uk: Illustration that looks like Harriet Vane (Harriet)
In fairness, if mobile phones with cameras had existed when I walked to school, and I had seen a giant salamander, I would certainly have recorded it*.



I am feeling a bit cheesed off, having come down with a cold just at the point at which I saw light at the end of the tunnel on a couple of work fronts. I cracked and went home for the afternoon in the hope that a rest might head it off a bit. We shall see.

*Technology outstrips language. This sentence originally read, "In fairness, if mobile phones with video cameras had existed when I walked to school, and I had seen a giant salamander, I would certainly have filmed it."
nineveh_uk: Illustration that looks like Harriet Vane (Harriet)
Snake eats crocodile after battle. This is not encouraging me ever to visit Australia.

In other news, my giant project has temporarily lifted allowing me to deal with the giant backlog of stuff left in its wake, the days really are getting significantly longer (especially when not cloudy), which is lovely, and I have bought a pair of red shoes. As this is the time of year when I am utterly bored of my work wardrobe, this is excellent, as it allows me to do something new without significant effort.
nineveh_uk: picture of an elk (elk)
This morning was brightened by video of a Swiss pine marten invading a football pitch. It is eventually caught and removed.

A man with the speed and skill to grab a pine marten and who clings on even after being bitten by it, is a man I’d want on my team. It was eventually caught a second time and removed by a gloved goalkeeper.
nineveh_uk: picture of an elk (elk)
It has been brought to my attention that other people may have watched slightly fewer David Attenborough (and other wildlife) documentaries**, in their formative years, and thus be a little hazy on the finer point of which large-antlered ruminant mammals are which. This post aims to remedy this deficiency.

Alces alces

Male and female.

This is the very big animal, the male of which has very big antlers, known in Europe as an elk, and in North America as a moose. Alleged to be shy and retiring, it is seldom seen except when crashing into cars, getting drunk on fermented apples, and engaging in threesomes in Swedish gardens.

Sometimes it is referred to as the European elk to avoid confusion with...

Cervus Canadensis

This is the considerably smaller (but still large) animal with big, but very different, antlers, again possessed only by the males, known in North America as an elk (and according to Wikipedia, the wapiti). It is sometimes called the North American elk to avoid confusion with alces alces. It was once believed to be a sub-species of the Eurasian deer...

Cervus elaphus

The red deer. This is the considerably smaller (but still large) animal that is in fact different species from Cervus Canadensis. Again, only the males have antlers.

Rangifer tarandus

This is the Latin name for the animal called the reindeer in Europe and Siberia and the caribou in North America. They do not customarily have red noses. Almost all migrate. Both females and males have antlers. Most European reindeer are semi-domesticated.

Oh yes, one more. This is a robin. This is an American robin.

*Thanks to [personal profile] biascut for the title.

**With accompanying books.

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